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Worship is Expectation

Elements of Worship, 3 of 6 The Lord confides in those who fear him;he makes his covenant known to them. Psalm 25:14 Expectation is hinted at in our last two reflections on worship, entrance and engagement—we expect to enter God’s presence and...

Worship is Engagement

Elements of Worship, 2 of 6 Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me. Revelation 3:20 Worship is like enjoying an intimate dinner with the God, where...

The Afterlife (?)

The word afterlife has been around since 1589. If you look it up in the dictionary you’ll find the primary definition is simple: existence after death. The implication is a secondary life after this one—this is life, afterlife comes after the years that count—after...

I Love Spring

I love swapping down-filled coats for fleecy sweatshirts, stepping over puddles instead of snow, smelling fresh air rather than forced heat. I love the sense of expectancy, the budding of hope, and faces quicker to smile. I love the smell—fresh and clean, like linen...

Unspoken

Then—The cost of a long distance call was worth the price to hear a loved one’s voice. We didn’t mind static, or interruption from a party line, or limits to privacy determined by the length of our phone cord. Still, even with the “modern” convenience of the...

Undivided

Then—In 1892 Francis Bellamy wrote: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” Indivisible, undivided, all for one and one for all—inspiring and idealistic words for a young nation....

Undimmed

Then—Ben Franklin flew his kite in a storm and lit up the world with his discovery of electricity. We progressed from torches, oil lamps, and candle wicks to light bulbs. The arc lamp was replaced by Edison’s incandescent light bulb and since then we’ve progressed...

Unconcealed

Then—Facts, just the facts—the who, what, when, and where. Reporters emulated Walter Cronkite who refused to let his personal beliefs affect his reporting. His iconic sign-off, “and that’s the way it is,” was taken at face value by the nation. If Cronkite reported it,...